CANADA: How to file a complaint

Continued from Immigration consultants, lawyers, and other representatives – Choose carefully

How to file a complaint

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) does not get involved in disputes between applicants and their immigration representatives. If you have a complaint about your representative, there are ways you can get help.

First, you must find out if your consultant, lawyer, notary or paralegal is an “authorized representative.” They must be a member in good standing of a Canadian provincial or territorial law society, the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC) or the Chambre des notaires du Québec.

If you have a complaint about:

an authorized immigration representative

– File a complaint with the regulatory body to which the consultant, lawyer, paralegal or notary belongs (e.g., the appropriate Canadian provincial or territorial law society, ICCRC, or the Chambre des notaires du Québec).

an employee of an authorized immigration representative

– Discuss your complaint with the licensed immigration consultant, lawyer, notary, paralegal or other representative. If you feel your concern was not dealt with properly, file a complaint with the regulatory body.

a non-authorized immigration representative

– If your immigration representative is not in Canada, send your complaint to the appropriate authorities in the country where the consultant lives or works.

– If your immigration representative is in Canada, file a complaint through the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council, the Canadian Consumer Information Gateway, the Canadian Council of Better Business Bureaus, the Law Society or the Chambre des notaires du Québec.

What if my immigration representative breaks the law while representing me?

If you know your immigration representative broke the law while representing you, they could be charged under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, the Criminal Code of Canada or the laws of your country of residence.

If the law they broke was immigration-related (for example, if your consultant submitted fraudulent documents with your application), immediately contact the CIC office processing your application or the Canada Border Services Agency.

If your representative has defrauded you personally (for example, if they charged you a fee, but did not fulfil what was promised or refuse to return your passport without another fee), contact your local law enforcement agency.

Also see:

Who can represent you
Types of representatives and what they are allowed to do for you

Tips on choosing a consultant, lawyer, and other representative
Helpful advice for potential immigrants

Don’t be the victim of a scam
How to protect yourself from dishonest immigration consultants (available in multiple languages)

Source and for more information visit Citizenship and Immigration Canada

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